Research looks to boost Parkinson’s treatment

Research is underway on the New South Wales north coast to help people with Parkinson’s disease.

New technology designed to improve the treatment of people with the chronic illnesses is the focus of the research project.

The study will be done by the Prince of Wales Medical Research Institute, Southern Cross University (SCU) and the University of NSW Rural Clinical School at Coffs Harbour.

SCU’s Associate Professor Rick van der Zwan is one of the project supervisors.

He says they are seeking north coast residents with Parkinson’s disease to test a new computer-based monitoring system.

“One of the challenges for anyone with Parkinson’s disease is finding things that assist them with their condition,” he said.

“But also when you live away from big cities, the disease actually sees them feeling quite isolated.

“What we are trying to do is to develop some techniques and technologies that allow them to feel they are part of a community, albeit an online one.”

Associate Professor van der Zwan says regional Parkinson’s patients will help them test the reliability of the computer-based monitoring system.

“It is a web-based device, although it can stand alone,” he said.

“We will be able to provide them with some hardware, then we’ll be able to collect that data from them.

“What we are trying to do is look to see if daily use is something that facilitates outcomes for them.”


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2 Responses to Research looks to boost Parkinson’s treatment

  1. Pingback: More Things That Annoy Me | My Parkinson's Disease Diary

  2. Pingback: More Things That Annoy Me | Parky Bill's PD Place

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